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Competition Giveaway! Win a copy of Owning It by Caroline Foran!

We are delighted to announce that thanks to the wonderful Caroline Foran and the kind people at Hachette Books Ireland Cinders have four copies of Caroline Foran’s Owning It.

We’ll be reviewing Owning It in our next issue of Cinders and would like to give you a chance to get your own copy.

For those facing the same struggle, Caroline explores exactly what anxiety is, its triggers and the various treatments – from CBT, acupuncture, diet and the often debated role of medication – that worked for her. With honesty, humour and a bullsh*t free perspective, Owning It is a no-frills account of anxiety from the front line.

Caroline Foran is now a freelance lifestyle journalist working in Dublin, writing for publications such as the Sunday Business Post and the Irish Times, as well as running her own digital publishing venture, GAFFInteriors.ie.

Having experienced the full spectrum of anxiety, from dealing with everyday work stresses – that are, of course, par for the course in today’s high-octane society – to a period of time where leaving the house alone proved difficult, Caroline has been chronicling her experiences and all that she’s learned in various published writings.

In order to win one of our copies comment below with your name and the answer to the question!

What aspect of mental health does Owning It help you to deal with?

We can’t wait to hear from you!

What we’re reading: Stephanie Garber, Sara Pascoe, Jane Austen, and Jo Baker

Caraval by Stephanie Garber

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Caraval is a book that has been all over my ‘recommended reads’ lists for months now. I finally picked up a copy to see what all of the hype was about. Billed as being similar to Erin Morgenstern’s The Night Circus Caraval tells the story of two sisters who are invited to a mysterious island, where they can participate in a carnival to achieve their ‘heart’s desire. Think a cross between The Hunger Games and Something Wicked This Way Comes. Unfortunately, I didn’t find it as nuanced as either one of those.

Continue reading “What we’re reading: Stephanie Garber, Sara Pascoe, Jane Austen, and Jo Baker”

Unusual Beauties and their Beasts continued

First published in Cinders issue three

What with the new adaptation of Beauty and the Beast hitting our screens earlier in the year it got us here in Cinders thinking about some of our favourite unconventional interpretations of the classic fairytale. Méabh McDonnell looks at the ways the tale as old as time can be interpreted.

Continue reading “Unusual Beauties and their Beasts continued”

Beauties and their Beasts

First published in Cinders issue three

What with the new adaptation of Beauty and the Beast hitting our screens earlier in the year it got us here in Cinders thinking about some of our favourite unconventional interpretations of the classic fairytale. Méabh McDonnell looks at the ways the tale as old as time can be interpreted.

A tiny ladybird edition of Beauty and the Beast was my favourite book as a child. The Disney animated movie also held a special place in my heart – still does in fact. Beauty and the Beast is a complex story. On the one hand it’s the magical tale about how love is all you need . It’s the concept that rings true with most people in love – it doesn’t matter what the person looks like – if you love them, you love them. That being said… on the other hand it’s a story where a young woman’s freedom is claimed by a vicious domineering beast who then proceeds to win her over by granting her ‘freedoms’ within what is a very well furnished prison. It’s hard to reconcile that with the happy story of love conquering all. Some people find that too much of a turn off – others might point out that fairytales were written in a time where they were meant to be more gothic than sweet. Regardless of which side of the fence you fall upon Beauty and the Beast’s enduring nature as a story is undeniable.

This is why I decided to compile some of my favourite interpretations of this classic story that I feel really capture the best Beauties and even better Beasts. Some are closer to the original tale than others but all have a special allure.

Continue reading “Beauties and their Beasts”

Recommended Reads: Lauren Nicolle Taylor, Moira Fowley Doyle, Renée Ahdieh

First published in issue four of Cinders

Nora and Kettle by Lauren Nicolle Taylor

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Nora and Kettle is a novel I stumbled upon while reading recommendations for fairytale fantasy online. After purchasing the book, I binged the whole story in one morning. The compelling little novel is a re-telling of Peter Pan but from a very different perspective. Set in 1950s New York in the aftermath of WWII  our ‘Peter’ is a Japanese-American runaway, nicknamed Kettle who is terrified of having his band of lost children (other Japanese runaways) discovered and re-homed.

Continue reading “Recommended Reads: Lauren Nicolle Taylor, Moira Fowley Doyle, Renée Ahdieh”

Recommended reads: Laini Taylor, Sarah J. Maas and Meg Grehan

First published in Volume One Issue Three

Strange the Dreamer by Laini Taylor

Strange the Dreamer is pure magic. that’s no surprise because it’s written by Laini Taylor, who writes only beautiful things. Her Daughter of Smoke and Bone series is a thing of pure beauty and her Dreamdark series are the badass fairytales that you wish your twelve year old self had. Strange the Dreamer is no different. She invents a completely new world for this series full of gods and lost cities and magic and dreams. I’m not going to tell you anything else but that Lazlo Strange is a librarian with a singular dream – to find the lost city of Weep. I guarantee if you read it you will.

Continue reading “Recommended reads: Laini Taylor, Sarah J. Maas and Meg Grehan”

Recommended Reads: Garth Nix, Leigh Bardugo and Truman Capote

First published in issue one of Cinders magazine.

Goldenhand by Garth Nix

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Most of you will probably be too young to remember Sabriel and Lireal by Garth Nix but there are few more kickass, capable heroines around. Sabriel and Lireal are necromancers but instead of raising the dead, they send them back to die proper deaths. The pair return to their adventures after more than ten years in Goldenhand and are all well worth a read. You’ll be battling undead zombies in your head for the rest of the month!

Continue reading “Recommended Reads: Garth Nix, Leigh Bardugo and Truman Capote”

Book Review Corner: Fathers Come First By Rosita Sweetman

 

First published in Cinders Volume One: Issue Two

It’s been a long time since I read a book that felt so much like the memoir of a very old friend. But that’s how Rosita Sweetman’s voice come across on the pag

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es of Fathers Come First. First printed in 1974, Lilliput Press have re-released the classic Dublin coming of age novel and its easy to see why. The novel follows Liz, a young woman in 1970s Dublin, who is so brilliantly drawn by Sweetman that she leaps up off of the page. After just reading a few pages of the book, I felt like I knew Liz.

The novel tells the story of a young girl trying to figure out her place in the world, living in an Ireland that is on the cusp of change but apparently hadn’t changed enough for women.

Liz is constantly trying to figure out the kind of person she should be and the people she should surround herself with, something I think most girls can identify with.  Continue reading “Book Review Corner: Fathers Come First By Rosita Sweetman”

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